Category:Qumran Studies

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Main Page -> Qumran Studies (QuS) -- Home Page
Main Page -> Qumran Studies (QuS) -- Home Page

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Qumran Studies / Research in the Dead Sea Scrolls is a field of research in Second Temple Judaism, that specializes in the study of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

4 Enoch treats Qumran Studies as a component of Second Temple Studies and the Dead Sea Scrolls as a corpus of Second Temple Literature. The Encyclopedia includes editions, translations, and monographs on the corpus of the Dead Sea Scrolls as well as on each of the documents in the collection.

The material can be sort out thematically or chronologically as well as by the languages of the woks.

Qumran Studies -- History of research -- Overview
Qumran Studies -- History of research -- Overview

The initial discovery of the first Dead Sea Scrolls from Cave 1 took place between November 1946 and February 1947 by some bedouins. Realizing the antiquity of the scrolls and the importance of the discovery, John C. Trever on 21 February 1948 photographed, both on black-and-white and standard color film, three of the scrolls. On 11 April 1948, Millar Burrows announced to the scholarly community the discovery of the scrolls in a general press release; the announcement was followed on April 26 by an analogous press release by Eleazar Sukenik. A preliminary excavation of the Cave was conducted from 15 February to 5 March 1949 by the Jordanian Department of Antiquities in collaboration with the Ecole Biblique et Archeologique, under the direction of Gerald Lankester Harding and Roland de Vaux. The first scholarly reports were published in 1948-49 by Eleazar Sukenik and Gerald Lankester Harding.

In 1950 Millar Burrows, with the assistance of John C. Trever and William H. Brownlee, published "The Dead Sea Scrolls of St. Mark's Monastery", a first collection of scrolls, without revealing the exact origin and provenience of the manuscripts. Eventually the scrolls from Cave 1 were purchased by the Israeli government. In the meantime, in November 1951, Roland de Vaux and his team from the ASOR had begun a full excavation of Qumran and the surrounding area. New caves were found and excavated.

The Palestine Archaeological Museum (now commonly known as the Rockefeller Museum) in East Jerusalem became the center for the study of the manuscripts. A team of international scholars, including Józef T. Milik, Frank Cross, Patrick Skehan, John Strugnell, Dominique Barthelemy, Jean Starcky, Clause-Hunno Hunzinger, and John Marco Allegro, began the study of the fragments.

On May 25-27, 1955 the first international conference of Qumran Studies was held in Strasbourg, France. The first collections of Dead Sea Scrolls translated into modern languages appeared in the 1950s, together with numerous introductions and reports, including that published by American journalist Edmund Wilson, that greatly contributed to popularize the importance o fthe discovery even among non-specialists.

In 1957-58, Józef T. Milik and Frank Cross offered the first general assessments of ten years of research on the scrolls. The Essene connection was firmly established and the scholarly interest focused on the theological features of the Qumran community and the implications on Christian Origins.



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Texts
Texts


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Cognate Fields
Cognate Fields


Pages in category "Qumran Studies"

The following 158 pages are in this category, out of 158 total.

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